Canada’s economy is growing, but its jobs are still falling

The headline on the cover of the Globe and Mail on Sunday morning read, “Canada’s economy looks set to grow for a second straight year.

But the jobs report, which was released on Wednesday, is still showing that the country has not kept pace with the rest of the world.”

As for why Canada is not growing faster than the rest on a per capita basis, the spokesperson continued, “Our trade deficit with the U.S. is bigger than it is with any other country in the world, and it is our inability to build a robust domestic economy that is the biggest drag on our economy.” “

The United States has a bigger economy and a much bigger job market than Canada, but Canadians have struggled to keep up with its growth.”

As for why Canada is not growing faster than the rest on a per capita basis, the spokesperson continued, “Our trade deficit with the U.S. is bigger than it is with any other country in the world, and it is our inability to build a robust domestic economy that is the biggest drag on our economy.”

This isn’t the first time that the Globe has published misleading statistics on Canada.

In November of 2014, it published an article entitled, ” Canada’s job growth rate is just .5 per cent.”

In June of that year, it reported that “the number of Canadians without a job grew to 5.5 per 100,000 people in November, the highest level since July 2015.”

It continued, saying that, “The economy is in a much better shape than it was in the summer of 2019.

The unemployment rate has fallen to 6.6 per cent from 9 per cent at the end of September.

The number of people with no job declined to 5,500 from 6,000.”

After the election of Justin Trudeau in late 2018, the Globe ran a front-page article with a headline that read, “‘Canada’ back in recession” as it reported, “There’s a real sense that Canada’s unemployment rate is still very high.

And the jobless rate remains stuck in the red.

But that’s a good thing.”

However, as The Globe’s article continued, “[n]ot all provinces are experiencing the same kinds of job growth.

Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba are experiencing a significant uptick in job creation, and British Columbia has had the biggest increase in job gains.

The rest of Canada is still in a recession.”

While the headline on that article stated that, “[f]or a second year in a row, the Canadian jobless rates are hovering around 5 per cent,” it actually stated that “Canada has not experienced an increase in unemployment since early October 2017.”

According to the official unemployment figures released by Statistics Canada, the number of Canadian adults without jobs dropped by 1.5 million in September 2018, but it was still projected to rise by 2.7 million jobs by the end, which still means that over half of Canadians are still unemployed.

This is why it is important to understand that Canada is far from being in recession.

Statistics Canada has stated that Canada has been growing for the past four quarters, but that the number in employment is still below the level seen in 2007.

However to the extent that unemployment is a problem, the unemployment rate could fall to 5 per 100 people in the next few months, according to the unemployment rates from Statistics Canada’s September and October data.

As such, Statistics Canada does not have any reason to be concerned about Canada’s recovery.

According To the Canadian Press, the latest unemployment figures, which are released every year, indicate that, over the last 12 months, Canada’s labor market has grown by 2,927,000 new jobs.

For more news on jobs and the economy, see the Globe’s list of Canada’s Top 10 Job Trends.

The Canadian Press article concluded with a list of the 10 most recent unemployment figures.

While it is true that the unemployment numbers have been revised upward from the earlier numbers, this does not necessarily mean that Canada had a job recovery in 2018.

There are other reasons to believe that Canada will be a stronger economy in 2019 than it has been in 2018, such as: 1) Statistics Canada has reported that the economic growth of the country in 2019 is expected to be 0.6 percentage points higher than in 2018 and that it will not be affected by the recent hurricanes in the Caribbean.

2) The economy has added an additional 9,000 jobs, or about 3,500 jobs per day, in September, as compared to the same period in 2018 when the number was 5,939.

3) Statistics Canadian has said that the labour market recovery in the last month of 2018 is the strongest since October 2018.

However, this is not necessarily true.

4) Statistics Quebec reported that unemployment rates are expected to drop from 5.3 per cent in September to 4.8 per cent by December. 5