The future of journalism is not in the news, it’s in the web

An article of faith?

Not if you’re a newscaster. 

“We’re not going to be able to cover the news,” Michael Kugelman, a senior vice president at WNYC, told reporters at the recent Television Critics Association winter press tour.

“We’re going to have to be content with what we can cover on our site.”

He continued, “The news that’s going to appear on the screen, it’ll be from an independent source, and we’re not covering it.” 

WNYC is a network that has been around since at least 2006, and has been a fixture in the New York Times for decades. 

But this fall, the network decided it had reached its breaking point. 

In February, the WNYW network announced it was ending its print-based news operations in favor of a digital model. 

Its editorial staff was fired last October and the company had struggled to keep its content relevant. 

And that’s why Kugelman made the comment, according to a source familiar with the situation. 

Kugelman is one of several WNYCs senior executives who have spoken out about the loss of newsprint. 

The station also lost one of its most popular personalities, Michael Wolff, who died in May. 

Last year, WNYN’s newsroom was a hive of activity, with newscasters writing for each other and writing articles for other outlets, the source said. 

As the WBRZ reported, many of the station’s writers and newsroom staff left after Wolff died. 

It’s unclear why Kugeelman chose to quit his job, but WNY’s new chief executive officer, David J. Lourdes, told the New Republic that the station had no plans to replace Wolff. 

According to the New Yorker, “New York’s news business has long been dominated by newspapers.

But it seems that the digital revolution is finally putting those traditional news outlets in the spotlight.”

 And this week, NBC announced that it was buying a newspaper in Baltimore. 

Forbes.com notes that this news is a huge blow to the traditional news media industry. 

There is still newsprint in the country, but not in print. 

This story will continue to be updated.